The Berean Expositor
Volume 10 - Page 156 of 162
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is styled Neokoros, or "temple-keeper" (see Acts 19: 35, margin), as an official title of
honour. The Ephesian Diana differed from the Roman and the Greek Artemis, bearing
the attributes of the great mother goddess rather than the virgin.
One of the great capitals that reared its head high above the earth when Paul was the
object of Ephesian rage now stand within a few feet of the ground in the Ephesus room,
and students of geometrical drawing will be interested to notice, in the eye of the volute,
the pin points still visible, whereby the mason swung the curves of the Ionic volute of the
capital.
THE ROMAN GALLERY.--Here are portrait busts of Roman Emperors: Csar
Augustus, in whose reign Christ was born;  Tiberius Csar, whose "image and
superscription" was probably upon the "penny" shown to the Lord, and of whom the
Jews said, "We have no king but Csar"; Nero, under whom Paul was first a prisoner
and finally a martyr for the faith and for Christ; Titus, who as the General of his father's
army brought about the fall of Jerusalem.
THE ROOM OF GREEK AND LATIN INSCRIPTIONS.--There are two slabs here
that we should notice. One, No. 171, a Greek inscription from Thessalonica, contains
names of magistrates styled Politarchs, a local title quoted in Acts 17: 6, 8. The fact of
this being local and yet finding its place in the record of the Acts is one of those little
touches which are worth volumes of argument with regard to the question of the
inspiration and accuracy of the Scriptures. The other slab is a cast of an inscription
which was set up over "the middle wall of partition", which divided the court of the
Gentiles from the court of Israel in the Temple at Jerusalem.  The following is a
translation.
NO ONE BEING A FOREIGNER MAY ENTER WITHIN
THE  ENCLOSURE  AROUND  THE  HOLY  PLACE.
WHOEVER IS APPREHENDED, WILL HIMSELF BE TO
BLAME FOR HIS DEATH WHICH WILL CERTAINLY
FOLLOW.
Let the reader open his Bible as he faces this slab, and there read the glorious
emancipation, access, and blessing that is recorded in Eph. 2:
Together, we have considered the antiquities of this Museum that have touched upon
practically every phase of Bible History. It seems fitting that one of the greatest facts of
the dispensation of the mystery should be so powerfully presented to our notice as we
take our leave of this wonderful collection of Bible evidences. Before we leave the
Museum, shall we not lift up our hearts in thanksgiving to God Who has caused so many
incontrovertible proofs of the trustworthiness and accuracy of His Holy Word to be
brought to light, just at the time when so-called Higher Criticism was apparently reducing
the verities of our faith to figments and fables. Our faith needs no such evidences; like
the blind man in John's Gospel, we know one thing, whatever else we may not know,
once we were blind, but now we see; nevertheless, we do not undervalue the Providence